Invited Sessions

SS1 – Emerging Micro-/Nano-Scale Sensing Technologies for Use in Medical Engineering

Session Chair: Hyuck CHOO, California Institute of Technology, USA

Description: This session will cover new and exciting emerging microscale and nanoscale technologies for biomedical sensors. These micro-/nanoscale physical transducers employ one or combinations of mechanical, optical, electronic, and chemical/molecular approaches that can be applied to therapeutics, diagnostics, imaging, sensing, and patient management.  Both early stage conceptual investigation and early translational stage work will be presented.

  • Interferometric vibration sensing for biomedical applications, Christian REMBE; Robert KOWARSCH; Laura MIGNANELLI, Clausthal Univ. of Technology, Germany (Invited; 406)
  • Nanodot-enhanced implantable intraocular pressure sensor for glaucoma management, Jeong Oen LEE, California Institute of Technology, USA (Invited; 407)
  • Smart thin film transistor with wireless communication system for disease diagnosis, Yong-Sang KIM, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Korea (Invited; 408)
  • Flexible micro/nano-sensors towards smart biomedical diagnosis, Inkyu PARK; Jaeho PARK, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; California Institute of Technology, USA (Invited; 409)
  • Optical sensing with plasmonic nanostructures, Andreas HORRER; Jonas HAAS; Patricia S. BLACH; Aylin KAYACIK; Valentin HENKEN-MELLIES; Sabrina RAU; Katrin KRIEG; Kathrin FREUDENBERGER; Lothar LEIDNER; Günter GAUGLITZ; Dieter P. KERN; Monika FLEISCHER, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen, Germany (Invited; 410)
  • 3D metamaterials at optical frequencies, Junsuk RHO, Gwanho YOON, Inki KIM, Minkyung KIM, Sunae SO, Jungho MUN, and Yongjoon JO, Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology; National Institute of Nanomaterials Technology, Korea (Invited; 411)

SS2 – Impedance-based Biosensor for Point-of-Care Testing

Session Chair: Cheng Hsin CHUANG, Southern Taiwan Univ. of Science and Technology, Taiwan

Description: This session seeks papers which describe the use of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) for transduction of biorecognition events at electrode surfaces. EIS represents a powerful technique for biosensor applications as it can sensitively monitor both resistive and capacitive changes at the electrochemical interface during analyte detection. The session broadly encompasses EIS biosensors (both Faradic and non-Faradic/Capacitive) utilizing a wide range of biorecognition elements like antibodies, nucleic acids, cells and enzymes, novel electrode designs and surface functionalization techniques and different amplification schemes for achieving improved sensitivities.

  • A simple and low cost biosensor for point-of-care detection in health care and environmental monitoring, Jayne WU, Univ. of Tennessee, USA (Invited; 412)
  • Impedance based MEMS biosensors for simultaneous detection of low concentration of multi-foodborne pathogens, Mahmoud ALMASRI, Univ. of Missouri, USA (Invited; 413)
  • A nano-gap field-effect biosensor based on solid-liquid interfacial potential, Chih-Ting LIN, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan (Invited; 414)
  • Impedance-based biosensors for point-of-care applications, Flavio C. B. FERNANDES; Paulo R. BUENO, São Paulo State Univ., Brazil (Invited; 415)
  • Impedimetric immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of bladder cancer in point of care testing, Muhammad Omar SHAIKH, Southern Taiwan Univ. of Science and Technology, Taiwan (Invited; 416)

SS3 – Advanced Actuators

Session Chair: Shih-Kang FAN, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan

Description: This session reports various advanced actuators based on diverse mechanisms, including (1) acoustically driven mircoswimmers, (2) electrically driven droplet and microgels for 3D in-vivo-like tissues, (3) single microbead, droplet, hydrogel particle and biological cell handling based on size and deformability, (4) microassembly of semiconductors, metals, dielectrics, and polymers for 3D heterogeneous architectures, (5) electromagnetically-driven biaxial 2D scanning micromirror for laser projection system, and (6) electrically tunable asymmetrical liquid lenses.

  • Bubble-powered micro swimming drone, Sung Kwon CHO, of Pittsburg, USA (Invited; 417)
  • 3D heterogeneous hydrogels assembled with prepolymer droplets and cells, Shih-Kang FAN, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan (Invited; 418)
  • Microfluidic-based micro-particle/cell handling devices for biochemical applications, Joonwon KIM, Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Korea (Invited; 419)
  • Micro-LEGO towards custom MEMS, Seok KIM, of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA (Invited; 420)
  • MEMS scanning mirror: design, fabrication, and application, Wenjiang SHEN, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Invited; 421)
  • An electrically tunable asymmetrical liquid lens system for optical coherent tomography, Fan-Gang TSENG, National Tsing Hua Univ.; Academia Sinica, Taiwan (Invited; 422)

SS4 – Cutting Edges of Organ/Body-on-a-Chip

Session Chair: Ken-ichiro KAMEI, Kyoto Univ., Japan

Session Co-Chair: Yoshikazu HIRAI, Kyoto Univ., Japan

Description: This session focuses on an emerging and important field on “Organ/Body-on-a-Chip.” This technology paves the way toward the next generation of drug discovery and chemical safety testing by mimicking human physiological and pathological conditions in vitro as well as minimizing the use of animal models. To reconstruct biological processes “on a chip”, technological development requires interdisciplinary works with micro/nano fabrication, microfluidics, sensors, pharmacology, cell biology, bioinformatics and tissue engineering, etc. All the key scientists from around the world will introduce how they could develop cutting edges of “Organ/Body-on-a-Chip”. Presenters and participants will discuss about its practical applications in near future.

  • Hydrogel microfibers for 3D tissue engineering, Hiroaki ONOE, Keio Univ., Japan (Invited; 427)
  • Organ-on-a-chip system with in-line biosensors for monitoring cell-secreted biomarkers, Su Ryon SHIN, Harvard-MIT Health Science and Technology; Harvard Medical School; Harvard University, USA (Invited; 426)
  • Cardiac regeneration modelled with high-density microfluidic culture, Drew TITMARSH, Scaled Biolabs Inc., USA (Invited; 425)
  • A pneumatic pressure-driven multi-throughput organs-on-a-chip, Shinji SUGIURA; Taku SATOH; Toshiyuki KANAMORI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan (Invited; 424)
  • Integrated heart/cancer on a chip: towards recapitulation of side effects, Ken-ichiro KAMEI; Yoshiki KATO; Yoshikazu HIRAI; Toshiyuki TSUCHIYA; Yong CHEN; Osamu TABATA, Kyoto Univ., Japan; Ecole Normale Supérieure, France (Invited; 423)

SS5 – Micro- and nanotechnology for translational research and medical diagnosis

Session Chair: SJ Claire HUR, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, USA

Description: As the clinical science is maturing, complexity of various diseases leading to large individual variations in treatment efficacy and prognostic has been revealed and increased demand for translational research to bridge the gap between novel scientific findings and state of the art technologies. The session will focus on recent advancement in micro- and nanotechnologies that facilitate discovery of new biomarkers and therapeutic strategies, shifting the diagnostic and prognostic paradigms for complex diseases.

  • Rational design of a surface enhanced raman scattering ultrahigh affinity nanoprobe for prostrate cancer imaging, Ishan BARMAN, Johns Hopkins Univ., USA (Invited; 432)
  • Label-free optical nanosensor: pushing its capability for molecular diagnostics, Qimin QUAN, Harvard Univ., USA (Invited; 428)
  • Probing single-cell metabolism by droplet microfluidics, Paul ABBYAD, Santa Clara Univ., USA (Invited; 430)
  • Tracking the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in engineered 3D microenvironments, Ian WONG, Brown Univ., USA (Invited; 431)
  • Vortex-assisted electroporation integrated with label-free cell purification, SJ Claire HUR, Univ. of California; Johns Hopkins University, USA (Invited; 429)

SS6 – Micro/Nano Manufacturing

Session Chair: Chao MA, Texas A&M University, USA

Description: This session seeks original research in the areas of micro/nano manufacturing which includes novel processes for fabrication of micro/nano structures and improvement of conventional processes using micro/nano technology.

  • Fundamental Study on Laser Interaction with Metal Matrix. Chao MA, Texas A&M Univ., USA (Invited; 437)
  • Laser additive manufacturing of metal matrix nanocomposites: relationship of nanoscale reinforcement and performance, Dongdong GU, Nanjing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China (Invited; 433)
  • Laser nanoimprinting engineered sub10nm structures for controlled and stabilized light matter interaction, Gary CHENG, Purdue Univ., USA (Invited; 435)
  • Laser-based micromanufacturing and laser-material interactions, Benxin WU, Purdue Univ., USA (Invited; 438)
  • Aligned short nanofiber composites, Saheem ABSAR; Stephanie HULSEY; Hongseok CHOI, Clemson Univ., USA (Invited; 434)
  • 3D freeze assembling printing of multi-functional aerogels, Dong LIN, Kansas State Univ., USA (Invited; 436)

SS7 – Two-dimensional Materials – Mechanics, Materials and Functional Devices

Session Chair: SungWoo NAM, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Description: The speakers in this invited session will present recent innovations in two-dimensional (2D) materials, focusing on mechanics, materials and functional devices. Invited speakers will share their research which elucidates unique electro-mechanical properties of 2D materials and explores potential applications of 2D materials, including flexible/wearable electronics, energy harvesting devices, and reconfigurable meta-materials. Interdisciplinary presentations from invited speakers are aimed to motivate synergistic research collaborations in the field of 2D materials.

  • 2D materials for wearable electronics, Jong-Hyun AHN, Yonsei Univ., Korea (Invited; 444)
  • Highly sensitive electronic skins from conductive microstructured air-gap gated molybdenum disulfide transistors, Yu HUANG, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, USA (Invited; 440)
  • The “power” of nanofluidics in 2D membranes, M. HEIRANIAN; N. R. ALURU, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA (Invited; 443)
  • Interface mechanics and its effect on morphology and functions of 2D nanomaterials, Alper GURARSLAN; Tao JIANG; Yong ZHU, North Carolina State Univ., USA (Invited; 439)
  • Tuning properties of MoS2 by mechanical strain, Hong LI; Sangwook PARK; Xiaolin ZHENG, Stanford Univ., USA (Invited; 441)
  • Folded and crumpled 2D materials – where shape enables new functions, Michael C. WANG; Pilgyu KANG; Juyoung LEEM; Jonghyun CHOI; SungWoo NAM, of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA (Invited; 442)

SS8 – Microfluidics for bio and energy applications

Session Chair: Sung-Yong PARK, National Univ. of Singapore, Singapore

Description: This session looks for the studies involved with micro/nanofluidic phenomena, cellular interactions, and micro/nano devices for various energy and bio-related applications.

  • Sheathless particle focusing and continuous separation in a viscoelastic fluid, Sangho KIM, National Univ. of Singapore, Singapore (Invited; 447)
  • Nanowire magnetoscope reveals a cellular torque with left-right bias, Ting-Hsuan CHEN, City Univ. of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Invited; 449)
  • Cell deformability based disease identification and therapeutics, Yanxiang DENG; Aram J. CHUNG, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA (Invited; 448)
  • Microrobots for precise drug delivery using nano-particles, Sanghun JEON; Jieun LEE; Eunhee KIM; Jin-young KIM; Hongsoo CHOI, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea (Invited; 445)
  • Electrowetting-driven liquid prisms; from material studies to optics and solar applications, Sung-Yong PARK, National Univ. of Singapore, Singapore (Invited; 446)

SS9 – Medical Microdevices

Session Chair: Masaru P. RAO, Univ. of California, Riverside, USA

Description: This session seeks submissions describing efforts focused on the application of MEMS and NEMS technologies towards medical devices. Of particular interest are submissions focused on the development, characterization, and/or validation of novel devices and instruments that leverage the opportunity embodied in MEMS & NEMS for enhancing existing medical practice, as well as creating entirely new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  • Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis for the blind, James D. WEILAND, Univ. of Michigan, USA (Invited; 450)
  • Nanoscale structures to enhance functionality of neural interfaces, Swathy S. KUMAR; Arati SRIDHARAN; Michael BAKER; Murat OKANDAN; Jit MUTHUSWAMY, Arizona State Univ.; Sandia National Laboratories, USA (Invited; 451)
  • MEMS switches for MRI: a microsystems approach, Marco F. AIMI; Dan SPENCE, GE Global Research & Development; GE Healthcare, USA (Invited; 452)
  • In-vivo microsystems enabled by smart material transducers, Kenichi TAKAHATA, Univ. of British Columbia, Canada (Invited; 454)
  • Miniaturizing implantable drug delivery technology with titania nanoporous membranes, Adam D. MENDELSOHN; Kathleen E. FISCHER, Nano Precision Medical, USA (Invited; 453)
  • An autonomous diaper embedded microsystem for urinary tract infection screening, Babak ZIAIE, Purdue Univ., USA (Invited; 455)
  • Nanoporous Gold: A New Material for Multifunctional Biomedical Device Coatings, Erkin SEKER, Univ. of California, Davis, USA (Invited; 456)
  • Recent progress towards ultrahigh throughput microinjection, Harish G. DIXIT; Renate STARR; Daniel NAMPE; Yanyan ZHANG; Christopher B. BALLAS; Hideaki TSUTSUI; Stephen J. FORMAN; Masaru P. RAO, Univ. of California, USA; City of Hope Beckman Research Institute and Medical Center, USA; Indiana Univ. of School of Medicine, USA (Invited; 457)

SS10 – Micro/Nano Fluidic Devices for Cellular Delivery and Analysis

Session Chair: Tuhin S. SANTRA, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, India

Description: Cells play significant roles in our day-to-day life. However, the behaviors of cells, their interactions with environment, intracellular physical or biological effects, are still not fully understood. In recent years, micro/nanofluidic devices are capable to manipulate and detect bio-samples, reagents, biomolecules at micro/nano scales and can fulfill the requirements for cellular delivery and analysis. The devices are not only useful for cell manipulation, isolation, separation, and lysis but also it can easily control biochemical, electrical, and mechanical parameters of cells with their precise fluidic control ability. These devices are potentially applicable for cellular delivery research and therapeutic applications.

  • Single cell micro-nano electroporation, Tuhin S. SANTRA, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, India (invited; 459)
  • Development of microfluidics targeting tumor heterogeneity, Jian CHEN, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, USA (invited; 460)
  • A microfluidic system for integrated analyses on nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acids of single cells, Hirofumi SHINTAKU, Kyoto Univ., Japan (invited; 458)
  • Single cell processing microsystems for high throughput function analysis of cells, Moeto NAGAI, Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Japan (invited; 461)

SS11-1 – Micro/Nanosystems Mechanobiology I

Session Chair: Deok-Ho Kim, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

Session Co-Chair: Pak Kin Wong, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA

Description: The investigation of mechanosensitivity of cells requires the development of novel micro/nanoscale systems with the capability to regulate the biomechanical microenvironment of cells. The session highlights several exciting platforms, including nanofibrous collagen gels with precisely defined porosity and mechanical properties for 3D cell culture, micropillar arrays for investigating tissue stiffening during fibrosis, nanopillar array with various angles for inducing cell polarization, actuatable micropatterned surface for modeling neural development, and tunable and multifunctional vascularized microenvironment for inflammation-angiogenesis. These works demonstrate the powerful applications of micro/nanosystems in fundamental and translational mechanobiology research.

  • Regulation of immune plasticity by physical cues in the microenvironment, Wendy LIU, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, USA (Invited; 519)
  • Mechanoregulation of collective cell migration, Pak Kin WONG, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA (Invited; 520)
  • Dynamic soft materials for deciphering ‘matrix structure—cell function’ relationships, Kristopher A. KILIAN, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois, USA (Invited; 521)
  • Matrix nanotopography as a regulator of cancer cell migration, Deok-Ho KIM, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA (Invited; 522)
  • Integrating MEMS Resonators with Optical Trapping for High-accuracy Mass Sensing, Lih LIN, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA (Invited; 523)

SS11-2 – Micro/Nanosystems Mechanobiology II

Session Chair: Yubing SUN, Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst, USA

Session Co-Chair: Weiqiang CHEN, New York Univ., USA

Description: The investigation of mechanosensitivity of cells requires the development of novel micro/nanoscale systems with the capability to regulate the biomechanical microenvironment of cells. The session highlights several exciting platforms, including nanofibrous collagen gels with precisely defined porosity and mechanical properties for 3D cell culture, micropillar arrays for investigating tissue stiffening during fibrosis, nanopillar array with various angles for inducing cell polarization, actuatable micropatterned surface for modeling neural development, and tunable and multifunctional vascularized microenvironment for inflammation-angiogenesis. These works demonstrate the powerful applications of micro/nanosystems in fundamental and translational mechanobiology research.

  • Modulation of nanofibrous collagen gel mechanics for 3D cancer and tissue cell culture, Hyunjoon KONG, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne, USA (Invited; 463)
  • Micropillar-based human microtissue array to study the cell-ECM interaction during fibrosis progression, Ruogang ZHAO, at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York, USA (Invited; 464)
  • Slanted nanopillar array for inducing polarized cell behaviors, Hong Nam KIM, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Korea (Invited; 465)
  • Actuatable micropatterned surface for interrogating the mechanical regulation in neural induction, Yubing SUN, Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst, USA (Invited; 466)
  • Tunable and multifunctional vascularized microenvironment for inflammation-angiogenesis study, Xin CUI; Weiqiang CHEN, New York Univ., USA; MetroTech Center, USA (Invited; 467)

SS12 – Engineering Bio-Nano Interfaces

Session Chair: Candan TAMERLER, Univ. of Kansas, USA

Description: Interfacing biological molecules predictably with solid materials is the key for hybrid composite materials, surface organization, and biomaterials. Bio-nano interfaces, therefore, are of interest for many engineering areas ranging from designing bioactive materials to nanodevices for a wide range of technological applications. This session on bio-nano interfaces and their design, tailoring, and engineering applications will emphasize the basic understanding of these soft interfaces and their implementation into practical medical and technological applications. A special emphasis will be given to assembly processes at solid liquid interfaces that lead to designed biomolecular and nanosolid self organizations towards functional materials and devices.

  • Precision assembly of biologically functional abiotic biotic materials, Carlo D. MONTEMAGNO, Univ. of Alberta; National Institute of Nanotechnology, Canada (Invited;470)
  • Synthetic genetic circuits at the bio-nano interface: from diagnostics to nanomaterials patterning, Urartu Özgür Şafak ŞEKER, Bilkent Univ., Turkey (Invited; 469)
  • Connecting biology and electronics with protons: from ion channels to shark electrosensors, Marco ROLANDI, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, USA (Invited; 468)
  • Engineering bio-nano interfaces to design functional hybrid materials, Candan TAMERLER, Univ. of Kansas, USA (Invited; 524)
  • Simulation of biological and nanostructured interfaces to discover new materials, Hendrik HEINZ, Univ. of Colorado-Boulder, USA (Invited; 471)

SS13 – Pathways to Commercialization Panel

Session Chair: Pak Kin WONG, Penn State Univ., USA

Session Co-Chair: Pei-Yu CHIOU, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, USA

Description: NEMS has the potential to change the face of medicine and engineering in the next decades.  There are significant obstacles in bringing a technological product to market.  This panel will share their experience and perspectives in pathways to entrepreneurship, including University research, IP portfolio management, negotiation with University licensing, corporation formation, SBIR funding, VC funding, FDA requirements, and product development.

  • What’s my company worth and how much should I raise: An Entrepreneur’s Perspective, Winn HONG, Univ. of Southern California, USA (Invited; 472)
  • Overview of design control for medical devices and combination products, Chris FOLK, ViaCyte, USA (Invited; 474)
  • We are all parabolas: the arrival of personalized medicine, Dean HO, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, USA (Invited; 475)
  • Intracellular cargo delivery platform for mitochondria transfer and regenerative medicine, Ting-Hsiang WU, NanoCay, LLC, USA (Invited; 476)
  • Technology transfer: bridging the gap between universities and industry, Benjamin CHU, University of California, Los Angeles, USA (Invited; 477)
  • Mobile microscopy, sensing and diagnostics through computational photonics, Aydogan OZCAN, University of California, Los Angeles, USA (Invited; 478)
  • From innovation to application: optically actuated dielectrophoresis moves into the market, Mark WHITE, BioFoundry Applications, Berkeley Light, USA (Invited; 479)
  • Panel discussion – Pathways to commercialization

SS14 – Biologically Inspired Dynamic Materials and Fluidic Devices

Session Chair: Tak-Sing WONG, Pennsylvania State Univ., USA

Description: From the structural hierarchy of sea sponge to the brilliant colors of morpho butterfly, nature has provided intricate blueprints for the design of highly functional engineered materials. To this end, scientists and engineers have utilized many of these nature inspired principles to create devices and materials for high impact applications in medicine and industries. In this invited session, we will showcase and discuss a range of novel biologically inspired materials, ranging from novel self-assembled structures for drug delivery to dynamic optical and liquid-repellent materials to microfluidic devices for thermofluids applications.

  • Engineering nanostructured drug-templated materials for biomedical applications, Cameron STEWART; Yoav FINER; Benjamin HATTON, Univ. of Toronto, Canada (Invited; 485)
  • Biologically inspired optical materials and devices: harnessing nature’s light manipulation strategies for dynamic optical materials, Mathias KOLLE; Sara NAGELBERG; Joseph SANDT; Cécile CHAZOT, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA (Invited; 480)
  • Bioinspired adaptive materials for optical molecular sensing and artificial phototropism, Mo SUN; Zhi ZHAO; Zhigang SUO; Jerry H. QI; Ximin HE, University of California, Los Angeles, USA (Invited; 481)
  • Electrical control of micro/nanoscale phenomena for microfluidics and heat transfer applications, Vaibhav BAHADUR, Arjang SHAHRIARI; Renee HALE; Katherine CARPENTER, Univ. of Texas at Austin, USA (Invited; 483)
  • Development of liquid-repellent surfaces capable of post functionalization, Xi YAO, City Univ. of Hong Kong (Invited; 482)
  • Cross-species liquid repellent surfaces, Yu HUANG; Birgitt B. STOGIN; Nan SUN; Jing WANG; Shikuan YANG; Tak-Sing WONG, Pennsylvania State Univ. (Invited; 484)

SS15 – Integrated Micro/Nano Devices for Biomedical Applications

Session Chair: Daisuke YAMANE, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Description: This session focuses on papers that show studies on devices, materials, fabrication processes, and system integration technology related to the broad range of integrated micro/nano devices for biomedical applications. This session also includes application-oriented researches that would use integrated micro/nano devices in the future. Both experimental and theoretical works are welcome.

  • Biomedical microsystems, Paddy FRENCH, Delft Univ. of Technology, Netherlands (Invited; 487)
  • Implantable micro photonic devices for biomedical applications, Jun OHTA; Makito HARUTA; Toshihiko NODA; Kiyotaka SASAGAWA; Takashi TOKUDA, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan (Invited; 489)
  • Bio-image sensors for non-label neurotransmitter imaging, Kazuaki SAWADA; Toshiaki HATTORI, Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Japan (Invited; 488)
  • Mechanical and electrical sensing of single biological cell properties within microfluidic devices, Olivier FRANCAIS; Bruno Le PIOUFLE, ESIEE-Paris, France; ENS de Cachan, France (Invited; 486)
  • Thin film transitor technology for biochemical engineering, Hiroshi TOSHIYOSHI, Univ. of Tokyo, Japan (Invited; 490)
  • Sub-1mG MEMS inertial sensors for biomedical applications, Daisuke YAMANE; Toshifumi KONISHI; Hiroshi TOSHIYOSHI; Masato SONE; Katsuyuki MACHIDA; Yoshihiro MIYAKE; Kazuya MASU, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan; CREST, Japan; NTT Advanced Technology Corporation; University of Tokyo, Japan (Invited; 491)

SS16 – Recent Development in Innovative Sensors

Session Chair: Yao-Joe YANG, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan

Description: The demand in sensors for numerous applications increases significantly during the past decade. This session presents the recent works in sensor development. Each work also describes the applications of the proposed sensors. The topics include: (1) blood oxygen sensing device for oral appliance application, (2) flexible tactile sensor with ECR for microsurgery, (3) reconfigurable sensor array by digital microfluidics, (4) polymer-based tactile sensing array with tunneling piezoresistive effect, (5) intelligent gas sensing system and its applications, and (6) theory and application of weakly coupled resonators.

  • The research and development of blood oxygen sensing device in smart oral appliance, Wen-Cheng KUO, National Kaohsiung First Univ. of Science and Technology, Taiwan (Invited; 495)
  • A flexible tactile sensor based on electrical contact resistance (ECR) for microsurgery and remote health monitoring, Yen-Wen LU, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan (Invited; 494)
  • Reconfigurable ion selective sensor array enabled by digital microfluidics, Ali FARZBOD; Hyejin MOON, Univ. of Texas at Arlington, USA (Invited; 493)
  • Polymer-based tunneling-piezoresistive tactile sensing array, Yao-Joe YANG, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan (Invited; 492)
  • Intelligent gas sensing system and its applications, Da-Jeng YAO, National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (Invited;517)
  • Weakly coupled resonators: theories and applications, Honglong CHANG, Northwestern Polytechnical Univ., China (Invited; 496)

SS17 – Emerging micro- and nano-scale sensing and manipulation techniques

Session Chair: Tim YEH, Univ. of Texas at Austin, USA

Description: This session will focus on exciting emerging microscale and nanoscale technologies for molecular, cellular and tissue level studies. The topics range from new photonic detectors, microfluidics-based systems biology and tissue engineering, advanced binding kinetics measurements, and optothermal tweezers for cell manipulation. Both early stage conceptual investigation and early translational stage work will be presented.

  • Heterogeneously integrated silicon photonics for the mid-infrared sensing, Mo LI, Univ. of Minnesota, USA (Invited; 497)
  • Characterization of binding kinetics in solution using 3D single-molecule tracking techniques, Tim YEH, of Texas at Austin, USA (Invited; 498)
  • Multicellular spheroids produced in microfluidics-generated double emulsions, Yi-Ping (Megan) HO, Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Invited; 499)
  • Optothermal tweezers for low-power and versatile manipulation of biological cells and nanoparticles, Yuebing ZHENG, of Texas at Austin, USA (Invited; 500)
  • A microfluidic systems biology approach for mitochondrial energetics, An-Chi WEI, National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan (Invited; 513)

SS18 – Biomedical NEMS/MEMS Devices

Session Chair: Thomas A. ZANGLE, Univ. of Utah, USA

Description: This session presents papers describing the use of NEMS and MEMS fabrication approaches for applications in biology and medicine. Papers in this session encompass biomarker detection strategies, micro and nanofluidic biomedical devices, and microscale control of the cell environment for therapeutic applications.

  • Top-down fabrication meets bottom-up synthesis: nanoelectronic barcoded microparticles for multiplexed molecular biomarker analysis, Mehdi JAVANMARD, Rutgers Univ., USA (Invited; 502)
  • Micro and nanofluidic devices for nucleic acid detection, Sumita PENNATHUR, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, USA (Invited; 503)
  • Next generation paper-based diagnostics for point-of-care testing, Daniel T. KAMEI, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, USA (Invited; 504)
  • Micro-engineered tumor niches to optimize combinatorial ablation therapies, Scott S. VERBRIDGE, Virginia Tech; Wake Forest Univ.; Wake Forest Medical Center, USA (Invited; 505)
  • Super soft lithography: micro-molded hydrogels to promote maturation of stem cell-derived muscle cells, Chelsey S. SIMMONS, Univ. of Florida, USA (Invited; 506)

SS19 – Advanced Nanomaterials and Transport for Energy, Electronics and Photonics

Session Chair: Yongjie HU, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), CA, USA

Description: Recent advances in many technologies including electronics, photonics, thermoelectrics, batteries, LEDs, power electronics, and fuel cells all have heavily explored nanoscale science and materials. Introducing new materials and structures is the key focus in current research areas. Yet, there are many challenges in the fundamental understanding and characterization of nanoscale transport where classical theories fail. This session includes invited speakers from interdisciplinary research areas and aims to motivate innovative research collaborations and new directions.

  • Cooperative Function in Atomically Precise Nanoscale Assemblies, Paul S. Weiss, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, and Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA (Invited; 529)
  • Thermal transport in amorphous Si nanostructures, Renkun CHEN, Univ. of California, San Diego, CA, USA (Invited; 525)
  • Alternative materials platform for plasmonic- and metasurface-based devices, Seth BANK, Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX, USA (Invited; 526)
  • Designing sub-10 nm morphology and functionality in silicon nanowires and nanowire networks, James F. CAHOON, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA (Invited; 527)
  • Mapping and controlling thermal spectra of 2D van der waals materials for energy harvesting, storage, and electronics, Yongjie HU, Un. of California, CA, USA (Invited; 372)

SS20 – Advanced Nanotheranostics

Session Chair: Jin-Woo Kim, University of Arkansas, AR, USA

Description: This session seeks papers that describe nanotechnology-based studies to improve existing medical therapeutics and diagnostics (theranostics) and to design novel nanotheranostic approaches for fighting disease. Both experimental and theoretical works are welcome.

  • Nanotheranostics of circulating pathological features in vivo, Jin-Woo Kim; Vladimir P. Zharov, Institute for Nanoscience & Engineering and Department of Biological & Agricultural Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA; Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA (Invited; 515)
  • A nanodiamond platform for stimuli-responsive detection and treatment of metastatic cancer, Edward Kai-Hua Chow; Mengjie Gu; Wang Xin; Weixin Hou, Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Invited; 514)
  • Development of microfluidic platform for studying human cancer cell metastasis, Jessie S. Jeon, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (KAIST), Korea (Invited; 511)
  • In vivo delivery of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein and donor DNA complexed to gold nanoparticles, Kunwoo Lee, GeneEdit, Berkeley, California, USA; Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA (Invited; 509)
  • In situ dynamic sensing of living cell adhesion, Ning Xi, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Univ. of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Invited; 528)
  • Long-term and active programming of bacterial subcultures in mass transport controllable microchemostats, Taesung Kim, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea (Invited; 518)

Others

  • More-than-moore: 3D heterogeneous integration into CMOS technologies, Albert WANG, Univ. of California, Riverside, USA (Invited; 213)
  • CD fluidics for extreme point of care – EPOC, Marc MADOU, Univ. of California, Irvine, USA (invited; 462)